Thursday, 26 December 2013

Three Steps of Self-knowledge

"Man knows what pain is. He has the experience of pain. From early childhood traumas to experiencing severe injuries, and most importantly, - experience of psychological pain, existential experience of trauma and awareness of abuse. When a person causes someone pain, he knows what is going through Another, these bodily and mental feelings are known to him. Committing violence against Another, he is himself experiencing violence, objectifying it in Another, and at the same time sharing it between Themselves and Another. One may recall that the Hunter and Victim are linked in the act murder. Therefore, the present suicide - the murder of the Other.

In this light, we can consider the Three Steps of Self-knowledge as the gradual killing of Another in Ourselves. Where the main suicide - it is the murder of the "Other" as an idea."




[Translated from the Russian into English by Evgeny Nechkasov and Nikarev Leshy]

“Человек знает, что такое боль. У него есть опыт боли. От первых детских травм до переживания тяжелых повреждений и, что главное, - опыт психологической боли, опыт экзистенциальных травм и насилия над сознанием. Когда человек причиняет кому-то боль, он знает что переживает Другой, эти телесные и ментальные ощущения ему известны. Совершая насилие над Другим, человек сам переживает это насилие, объективируя его в Другом и одновременно разделяя его между Собой и Другим. Можно вспомнить о том, что Охотник и Жертва связаны между собой актом убийства зверя Охотником. Поэтому, настоящее самоубийство - это убийство Другого.

В этом свете можно рассмотреть Три Ступени Самопознания как поэтапное убийство Другого в Самом Себе. Где главное самоубийство - это уже убийство "Другого" как идеи.”

-  Evgeny Nechkasov

(Source) English link to this entry on the Russian left-hand path website of Svarte Aske

1 comment:

  1. I have yet to bless and save for a turkey-shooter and make it for the Penn state red woods to make a first dedication and smoke the wild turkey. I'm familiar with the second dedication.

    ReplyDelete